Civil society inclusion in public innovation discussed in Tartu

 

 

NL5_news_4During the 6th International Partners Meeting in Tartu, Estonia on 23rd and 24th January 2014, CCIC partners held a Thematic Group Meeting on Civil Society Inclusion in Public Innovation, where some interesting relevant initiatives were presented.During the 6th International Partners Meeting in Tartu, Estonia on 23rd and 24th January 2014, CCIC partners held a Thematic Group Meeting on Civil Society Inclusion in Public Innovation.

Chaired by lead partner for the thematic group, Aberdeen, the partners heard presentations on the following relevant initiatives:

Lazio: I-SCOPE is a 3-year initiative on inter-operable smart city services through an open platform for an urban ecosystem. It aims to improve decision-making in urban planning, promote inclusion and involve citizens. Its main deliverable is a web platform on the topics of mobility, energy (optimising energy consumption) and noise (environmental noise mapping and monitoring). See www.iscopeproject.net for more information.

Tartu: Tartu Rural Development Association presented their “Finding Innovation” practice which aims to train and develop small businesses in south Estonia, to promote tourism and destination marketing, community collaboration and product development. See www.tas.ee for more information.

Aberdeen: Aberdeen presented the Accord Card – a smartcard that provides an electronic system for dealing with payment of a diverse range of public and community services, including school meals, concessionary travel, library membership, sports facilities etc. The second presentation featured Aberdeen City Voice – a form of online and in-person citizen engagement through themed questionnaires. It aims to fully and directly engage the local community in the City Council’s policy and budget-setting and decision-making.

Following the good examples’ profiles, group discussions sought to assist the partners in identifying whether they could consider adapting and adopting these good practices in their respective cities by addressing the following questions:
•    To what extent does your city share the objectives of/need for this good practice?
•    How easily importable is this good practice for your city? Does it need to be adapted or can you adopt it as it is? In what ways might it need to be adapted to fit your city’s circumstances?
•    To what extent is the “exporting” city able to support you in your city’s import of this good practice?
•    What challenges does your city face in importing this good practice?
•    How will you measure its success?
•    What difference will be made to your city by importing this good practice?

Partners are currently involved in deep delegations which incorporate further and more specific discussions regarding the import of good practices across all four themes of the project.